Event: The Neuroethics of Addiction

A free public event being held April 14 (9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.) at the Wosk Centre, The Neuroethics of Addiction promises to be an engaging morning of discussions on, well, the neuroethics of addiction.  This session will include topics such as:

  • Addiction is a Brain Disease
  • Treatment of Addiction and concurrent disorders between prohibition and stigma
  • Reaping Benefits & Avoiding Misuse of Addiction NeurobiologynNeuroethics of Addiction: From the Laboratory to the Street

For more info, check out the National Core for Neuroethics.

One Reply to “Event: The Neuroethics of Addiction”

  1. Wow, I don’t believe I’ve come across the term “neuroethics” before. However, I do recall a few years ago seeing FMRI results among two surprisingly similar groups — devoutly religious individuals actively praying and enthusiastic opiate consumers indulging in doses that were not about pain management. Actually, people in those two groups probably tend to live different lives. However, the regions of their brains firing away at peak activity levels were virtually identical. I saw this as a sign Marx was stunningly insightful with his observation that “religion is the opiate of the people.”

    Anyway, skimming bits of literature just now makes me think that a new specialty is well on the way to substantiating psychological determinism/behaviorism while doing only a very tiny bit to make freewill a less useful illusion. I’m all for taking invisible unexplainable bits of magic out of popular human perspectives on the world, especially when physical evidence keeps popping up to fill those gaps. Yet I’m also glad serious philosophers are in the mix, since it may never be practical to collect enough information and perform enough computation to render human psychology as free from mystery as are most of our below-the-neck physical mechanisms.

    Demonweed’s last blog post..What You Should Think About Balance

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